I tell my students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else. This is not just a grab-bag candy game.’

— Toni Morrison

(Source: medievalpoc, via garychou)

Published on 18 Sep 2014
Reblogged from medievalpoc

We are as gods and might as well get good at it. So far, remotely done power and glory—as via government, big business, formal education, church—has succeeded to the point where gross defects obscure actual gains. In response to this dilemma and to these gains a realm of intimate, personal power is developing—power of the individual to conduct his own education, find his own inspiration, shape his own environment, and share his adventure with whoever is interested. Tools that aid this process are sought and promoted by the WHOLE EARTH CATALOG.

— 

(Source: Wikipedia)

Published on 16 Sep 2014
"We hold these truths to be [sacred and undeniable] self-evident, that all men are created equal [and independent].”

"We hold these truths to be [sacred and undeniable] self-evident, that all men are created equal [and independent].”

Published on 14 Sep 2014

The Reason-Rupe poll, for example, found that 42 percent of millennials “prefer” socialism as an economic and political system, a result that can send shivers down the spines of older anti-communists. Yet when things are put in a language that millennials actually use, a very different picture emerges. When the Reason-Rupe poll asked millennials whether they preferred a free market economy or one managed by the government, the younger-generation’s diapers looked considerably less red: 64 percent prefer a free market, compared to just 32 percent who favor state management. As befits a generation known for producing a growing list of billionaire entrepreneurs, millennials have highly positive visions of business, with 55 percent saying that they’d like to start their own some day.

— 

(Source: reason.com)

Published on 14 Sep 2014

Published on 12 Sep 2014

(Source: topulence, via aestheticapproach)

Published on 10 Sep 2014
Reblogged from topulence

Published on 10 Sep 2014

I live in Ohio. I knew who I was voting for. I was sick of the ads by midsummer. I avoided local TV stations, I disabled my answering machine because of robocalls. I only picked up the phone if it was someone I knew, or had reason to believe was important. If I did pick up the phone and heard the beginnings of a robocall I hung up.

I do not mind answering surveys, actually. I am happy to have my opinion be known. Unfortunately by early in the election season I was so inundated with ads and robocalls from candidates and other political groups that I prevented myself from being available. I voted for Obama. I wonder how many others there were like me.

It was a robocall from Huckabee asking me to support Republicans that did me in. Honestly! I am a single, female, college professor and molecular geneticist. What were they thinking?

— 

(Source: The New York Times)

Published on 10 Sep 2014

Published on 10 Sep 2014

(Source: Spotify)

Published on 9 Sep 2014